Denmark

Danish Crown reports reduced CO2 emissions for pig meat

Pork

Danish Crown's suppliers of pigs have reduced CO2 emissions by almost 7% on average since 2016, and their goal is to cut another 4% by the end of 2022.

Posted on Jan 13 ,08:02

Danish Crown reports reduced CO2 emissions for pig meat

Carbon footprint in for Danish pig meat continues to decline, according to a Danish Crown press release. The company's suppliers of pigs have reduced CO2 emissions by almost 7% on average since 2016, and their goal is to cut another 4% by the end of 2022. "This corresponds to the total carbon footprint from 12,000 Danish households," informs the press release.
Over the past year, Danish Crowns has climate-certified a share of the company’s owners, the Danish Farmers, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pigs delivered to the Group's Danish abattoirs. Data has been collected on everything from feed to power consumption to slurry handling by the company's owners and on average they already now have reduced the CO2 load by 6.7% since 2016.
"Our owners and Baltic Control have done a fantastic job of forming an overview of the environmental impact of each farmer. At the same time, I am really pleased that our owners have a total goal of reducing their climate footprint by an additional 4.1 percentage points before being re-visited by Baltic Control in 2022," says Nicolaj Nørgaard, Vice President, Danish Crown Owner Services.
If the owners reach the goals, they have set for the next three years, it equates to a reduction of 26.5 kg. CO2 per pig compared to the norm from 2016. When increased with Danish Crown's current slaughter figures, it gives a total saving for primary production of 110,250 tonnes of CO2 over the next three years or 100 tonnes of CO2 every single day.
If the farmers' own targets for 2022 are met, the total CO2 reduction of Danish Crown's owners will be very close to 30 per cent compared to 2005. Also, the reduction of CO2 emissions achieved at Danish Crown's abattoirs will be added, but those are yet to be calculated, said the company.

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